Higgins Clan Book

Higgins Clan Book

Settled from earliest times on the Emerald Isle, bearers of the Higgins name, in all its rich variety of spellings, for centuries fulfilled the honoured role of hereditary poets to a number of powerful Irish clans.
 
In common with other native Irish, many were later forced to seek new lives in foreign lands – where they subsequently achieved distinction and acclaim.
 
One intrepid bearer of the name was the American journalist and author Marguerite Higgins, recognised as having advanced the cause of equal access to war zones for female reporters.
 
During the Second World War she witnessed the horror of the newly liberated Dachau concentration camp, and later covered the Korean War – her coverage of the conflict resulting in her becoming the first woman to win a Pulitzer Prize for international reporting, while she also interviewed world leaders including the Soviet Union’s Nikita Khruschev.
 
Presented here is the proud tale of bearers of the Higgins name.


 

Higgins Clan Mini-Book Excerpt

One particularly intrepid and pioneering bearer of the Higgins name was the American journalist and author Marguerite Higgins, recognised today as having advanced the cause of equal access to war zones for female war correspondents.

Born in 1920 in Hong Kong, where her American father worked for a shipping company, she joined the staff of the New York Herald Tribune as a news reporter in 1942, eventually persuading its management to assign her to war torn Europe.

It was in Germany in April of 1945 that she witnessed the horror of the newly liberated Dachau concentration camp, later receiving a U.S. Army campaign ribbon for her assistance during the surrender of the camp’s S.S. guards.

After covering the Nuremberg war crimes trials and the Soviet blockade of Berlin, she was appointed chief of the Tribune’s Tokyo office in 1950, and, despite initial fierce opposition from some quarters, covered the Korean War.

Her coverage of the conflict resulted in her becoming the first woman to win a Pulitzer Prize, in 1951, for international reporting.

Her dogged persistence later led to her being granted interviews with the Spanish dictator Francisco Franco, the Soviet Union’s Nikita Khrushchev and India’s Jawaharlal Nehru, while in 1955 she became chief of the Tribune’s Moscow bureau.

Leaving the Tribune for Newsday magazine in 1963, she later covered the Vietnam War and wrote a best-selling book about the conflict, Our Vietnam Nightmare.

She died in 1966 from a tropical disease that she had contracted on one of her many assignments, and as a mark of honour was interred in Washington’s Arlington National Cemetery – also the final resting place of her husband, U.S. Air Force General William E. Hall, whom she had married in 1952.

 

Product Code: CB00176
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